Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A cattle-driver on the great plains of the United States. Sometimes used for cow-boy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • One unlucky and simple-minded cow-puncher, who had never been east of the great plains in his life, unwarily boasted that he had an aunt in New York, and ever afterward went by the name of "Metropolitan Bill."

    The Rough Riders

  • One of the Wallers was a cow-puncher from New Mexico, the other the champion Yale high-jumper.

    The Rough Riders

  • A brave but fastidious member of a well-known Eastern club, who was serving in the ranks, was christened "Tough Ike"; and his bunkie, the man who shared his shelter-tent, who was a decidedly rough cow-puncher, gradually acquired the name of "The Dude."

    The Rough Riders

  • The men were totally unconcerned, and I do not think they realized that any fighting was at hand; at any rate, I could hear the group nearest me discussing in low murmurs, not the Spaniards, but the conduct of a certain cow-puncher in quitting work on a ranch and starting a saloon in some New Mexican town.

    The Rough Riders

  • At one time, as I was out of touch with that part of my wing commanded by Jenkins and O'Neill, I sent Greenway, with Sergeant Russell, a New Yorker, and trooper Rowland, a New Mexican cow-puncher, down in the valley to find out where they were.

    The Rough Riders

  • Down at the bunk houses the dogs began to yap and some full-throated cow-puncher sent forth

    Nan Sherwood at Rose Ranch

  • A highly competent young person is Johnny and a cow-puncher of parts.

    The Boy Scouts Book of Campfire Stories

  • At the mention of the ruffian cow-puncher the boys looked at one another and then at their father, who said:

    Comrades of the Saddle The Young Rough Riders of the Plains

  • Peter Hamilton, whose particular skill as a cow-puncher lay in that branch of the profession known as "cutting out," found that the work of the rustlers had been carried on with no unsparing hand since the early spring round-up.

    Judith of the Plains

  • There had been a deal of letter-writing between her and the young cow-puncher of late, of which perforce, by a singular irony of fate, the postmistress had been the involuntary instrument.

    Judith of the Plains

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