Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A specialist in the collection and examination of the physical evidence of crime.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An authority in criminal law; one versed in criminal law.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun rare One versed in criminal law.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun US A person who specializes in the collection and examination of forensic evidence at a crime scene.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As always, Deaver's technical knowledge of the work of a criminalist is very good, if at times overstated.

    Reader reviews of The Empty Chair by Jeffery Deaver.

  • Amy Brodeur (May 6), criminalist from the Boston Police Crime Laboratory and faculty member in the Biomedical Forensic Sciences Program at Boston University.

    Archive 2007-05-01

  • Amy Brodeur (May 6), criminalist from the Boston Police Crime Laboratory and faculty member in the Biomedical Forensic Sciences Program at Boston University.

    Inspiring Minds: Meet Women in Science

  • The criminalist was a retired captain of the NYPD.

    The Burning Wire

  • The criminalist was a retired captain of the NYPD.

    The Burning Wire

  • LAWRENCE KOBILINSKY, CRIMINALIST: A criminalist is a person who uses scientific methods and technology to solve problems related to the law -- mainly, criminal law.

    CNN Transcript Apr 29, 2003

  • Rhyme decided he hated this man, who was acting as if the criminalist were the oddest kind of circus freak.

    A Lincoln Rhyme eBook Boxed Set

  • Not essentially psychological but of importance for the criminalist are the inferences we may draw from Herbert Spencer's assertion that people whose ancestors have worked with their hands possess heavy hands.

    Criminal Psychology: a manual for judges, practitioners, and students

  • If we understand by the term cause the axiom that every change has an occasion, hence that every event is bound up with a number of conditions which when lacking in whole or in part would prevent the appearance of the event, while their presence would compel its appearance, then the whole business of the criminalist is the study of causes.

    Criminal Psychology: a manual for judges, practitioners, and students

  • •Consumer Credit Protection Act of 1968: See: Truth in Lending Act. • Criminalism: A new word invented by the Editor of this service, meaning the perpetration and exploitation of organised criminal operations in the interests of political strategy and / or one or more secret agendas; noun, 'criminalist', an operative or other cadre who engages in criminalist activities and assumes that he is protected and can therefore continue such activities beyond and above the reach of the Rule of Law.

    Teknosis

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