cross-fertilised love

cross-fertilised

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • And cross-fertilised (particularly within the field of strange fiction).

    The Assumption of Authority 2

  • This is only enhanced by a bizarrely cross-fertilised repertoire, from 1930s big band swing to free improv.

    This week's new live music

  • And cross-fertilised (particularly within the field of strange fiction).

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • What has become clear is that at least in the paleo-climate area the professional debate has been rather restricted, that it has not been cross-fertilised by other disciplines notably statistics and econometrics.

    IPCC and Data Access « Climate Audit

  • Talking exclusively to his own tape recorder, Rob McGibbon garbled: I am delighted to be successfully aligned with such an iconic - if, as yet unknown - creation as ‘Sally’ and fully believe that in Paper Passions we have found genuine cross-fertilised synchronicity with oceans of blue sky ahead of us for this venture.

    Archive 2007-01-01

  • Talking exclusively to his own tape recorder, Rob McGibbon garbled: I am delighted to be successfully aligned with such an iconic - if, as yet unknown - creation as ‘Sally’ and fully believe that in Paper Passions we have found genuine cross-fertilised synchronicity with oceans of blue sky ahead of us for this venture.

    Sally Cards Plug

  • But, as Darwin remarks, profuse expenditure is nothing unusual in nature, and it appears to be more profitable for a plant to yield a few cross-fertilised than many self-fertilised seeds.

    Life of Charles Darwin

  • An immense variety of plants are habitually self-fertilised, and their numbers probably far exceed those which are habitually cross-fertilised by insects.

    Darwinism (1889)

  • When garden-peas were artificially cross-fertilised by Mr. Darwin, it seemed to do them no good, as the seeds from these crosses produced less vigorous plants than seed from those which were self-fertilised; a fact directly opposed to what usually occurs in cross-fertilised plants.

    Darwinism (1889)

  • He planted seeds from cross-fertilised and self-fertilised plants on two sides of the same pot exposed to exactly similar conditions, and in most cases the difference in size and vigour was amazing, while the plants from cross-fertilised parents also produced more and finer seeds.

    Darwinism (1889)

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