Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A contest with cudgels.
  • noun The science or art of combat with cudgels.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When these men are nabbed, they give up their venture as soon as it goes beyond cudgel-play, and they never lie in wait for

    Mary Anerley

  • He unluckily took lessons in his youth in the noble science of defense, and having accomplished himself in the use of his limbs and his weapons, and become a perfect master at boxing and cudgel-play, he has had a troublesome life of it ever since.

    John Bull

  • The sports were of the sort characteristic of such a gathering -- wrestling and foot-races, target-shooting and bouts at cudgel-play and night-stick.

    The Doomsman

  • A very ` tomrig and rump-scuttle, 'she knew only the sports of boys: her war-like spirit counted no excuse too slight for a battle; and so valiant a lad was she of her hands, so well skilled in cudgel-play, that none ever wrested a victory from fighting Moll.

    A Book of Scoundrels

  • A very 'tomrig and rump-scuttle,' she knew only the sports of boys: her war-like spirit counted no excuse too slight for a battle; and so valiant a lad was she of her hands, so well skilled in cudgel-play, that none ever wrested

    A Book of Scoundrels

  • Berkshire and Somersetshire were the ancestral homes of cudgel-play, quarter-staff, and single-stick.

    Old English Sports

  • Here they held their rural sports, and fought their bouts of quarter-staff and cudgel-play, grinned through horse-collars, and played pipe and tabor at many a rustic feast, when life was young and

    English Villages

  • It is very fine and romantic to possess for your very own a finely tempered and trusty sword-blade, but whether it is the best weapon to counter with the common cudgel-play of Fate -- that's another question.

    'Twixt Land and Sea

  • Lewis either at back-sword, single falchion, or cudgel-play; but then he was very apt to quarrel with his best friends, especially if they pretended to govern him.

    English Satires

  • By these methods he had acquired immense riches, which he used to squander [177] away at back-sword, quarter-staff, and cudgel-play, in which he took great pleasure, and challenged all the country.

    English Satires

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