Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of cuirass.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • 40,000 Cavalry, regular and irregular, among which a Brigade of Akalies in cuirasses and chain armour, "The Invincibles."

    The Autobiography of Liuetenant-General Sir Harry Smith, Baronet of Aliwal on the Sutlej, G. C. B.

  • One of their cuirasses, pierced on the shoulder by a ball from a biscayan,9 is in the collection of the Waterloo Museum.

    Les Miserables

  • As soon as it was morning Jaland mounted with two hundred and sixty-thousand fighting-men, clad cap-à-pie in hauberks and cuirasses and strait-knit mail-coats, the kettle-drums beat a point of war and all drew out for cut and thrust and fight and fray.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • He calls these petits sachets de baudruche “Candoms, from the doctor who invented them” (Littré ignores the word) and declares that the famous Ricord compared them with a bad umbrella which a storm can break or burst, while others term them cuirasses against pleasure and cobwebs against infection.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • We might imagine the scene: French leaders with their burnished helmets, gleaming cuirasses, arquebuses, flags, and feathers; the Huron and Algonquin in vivid face paint, buckskins, bows, arrows, beadwork, and more feathers.

    Champlain's Dream

  • The furious onsets of those great squadrons with cuirasses of iron and breasts of steel had ground the infantry to nothing.

    Les Miserables

  • A confusion of helmets, of cries, of sabres, a stormy heaving of the cruppers of horses amid the cannons and the flourish of trumpets, a terrible and disciplined tumult; over all, the cuirasses like the scales on the hydra.

    Les Miserables

  • They heard the swelling noise of three thousand horse, the alternate and symmetrical tramp of their hoofs at full trot, the jingling of the cuirasses, the clang of the sabres and a sort of grand and savage breathing.

    Les Miserables

  • They wore casques without horse-tails, and cuirasses of beaten iron, with horse-pistols in their holsters, and long sabre-swords.

    Les Miserables

  • We might imagine the scene: French leaders with their burnished helmets, gleaming cuirasses, arquebuses, flags, and feathers; the Huron and Algonquin in vivid face paint, buckskins, bows, arrows, beadwork, and more feathers.

    Champlain's Dream

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