Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of cunning.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Heeding such persuasions, India has proved herself not witless against the thousand cunnings of time.

    Autobiography of a Yogi

  • His financial independence was one reason why my alarmingly outspoken Master was innocent of the cunnings of diplomacy.

    Autobiography of a Yogi

  • His financial independence was one reason why my alarmingly outspoken Master was innocent of the cunnings of diplomacy.

    Autobiography of a Yogi

  • Heeding such persuasions, India has proved herself not witless against the thousand cunnings of time.

    Autobiography of a Yogi

  • 'Tis true some people have it that have not wit, but there are at least as many foolish people I have ever observed to be fullest of tricks, little ugly plots and designs, unnecessary disguises, and mean cunnings, which are the basest qualities in the world, and makes one the most contemptible, I think; when I once discover them they lose their credit with me for ever.

    The Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, 1652-54

  • She sat there full of new knowledge and new importance, brimming with experience and strange, unexpected aspirations, purposes, yes -- and cunnings!

    The Old Wives' Tale

  • Set before their eyes, in your discourse, and let them see, as in a glass, their own disquiets, their little cunnings, their trifling projects, and their vain hopes.

    The Works of John Dryden

  • Set before their eyes, in your discourse, and let them see, as in a glass, their own disquiets, their little cunnings, their trifling projects, and their vain hopes.

    The works of John Dryden, $c now first collected in eighteen volumes. $p Volume 16

  • We'll make a solemn wager on your cunnings: I ha't.

    Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

  • 'Tis true some people have it that have not wit, but there are at least as many foolish people that have no good nature, and those are the persons I have ever observed to be fullest of tricks, little ugly plots and designs, unnecessary disguises, and mean cunnings, which are the basest qualities in the world, and makes one the most contemptible, I think; where I once discover them they lose their credit with me for ever.

    Letters from Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple (1652-54)

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