Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of cupidity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He observed, "The collapse of the old order had awakened vast cupidities and revived venomous hatreds."

    Re: Honesty, History, And A College Of History And Law

  • The museums are run by human beings, or by governments, with their own prides, cupidities, and corruptibilities.

    Banquets of the Black Widowers

  • To that idea — rather than to the cupidities which it was intended to keep in check — were imputed the aggressive policies which had led to war.

    BALANCE OF POWER

  • And yet for the time being, held in the opposing grip of two firm cupidities, it was safe, the great Harden library, once the joy of scholars, loved with such high intellectual passion, and now the centre of so many hot schemes and rivalries and lusts.

    The Divine Fire

  • Marx and Lassalle, have inspired all the revolutions, have had to confess that, after all, the dog will return to his vomit and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire; and we may as well make up our minds that Man will return to his idols and his cupidities, in spite of "movements" and all revolutions, until his nature is changed.

    Revolutionist's Handbook and Pocket Companion

  • Now suppose a man comes along: a man who has no sense of the golden age, nor any power of living in the present: a man with common desires, cupidities, ambitions, just like most of the men you know.

    The Perfect Wagnerite, Commentary on the Ring

  • Both are alike forced to borrow motives for the more strenuous actions of their personages from the common stockpot of melodramatic plots; so that Hamlet has to be stimulated by the prejudices of a policeman and Macbeth by the cupidities of a bushranger.

    Epistle Dedicatory

  • Even the Jews, who, from Moses to Marx and Lassalle, have inspired all the revolutions, have had to confess that, after all, the dog will return to his vomit and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire; and we may as well make up our minds that Man will return to his idols and his cupidities, in spite of “movements” and all revolutions, until his nature is changed.

    The Revolutionist’s Handbook

  • Both are alike forced to borrow motives for the more strenuous actions of their personages from the common stockpot of melodramatic plots; so that Hamlet has to be stimulated by the prejudices of a policeman and Macbeth by the cupidities of a bushranger.

    Man and Superman

  • Although a literary artist, Tolstoy was one of those primitive oaks of men to whom the superfluities and insincerities, the cupidities, complications, and cruelties of our polite civilization are profoundly unsatisfying, and for whom the eternal veracities lie with more natural and animal things.

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

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