Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of curragh.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There were even curraghs, composed of ox hides stretched over hoops of willow, in the manner of the ancient British, and some committed themselves to rafts formed for the occasion, from the readiest materials that occurred, and united in such a precarious manner as to render it probable that, before the accomplishment of the voyage, some of the clansmen of the deceased might be sent to attend their chieftain in the world of spirits.

    The Fair Maid of Perth

  • Back at Mapula we climbed into log curraghs; canoes that our guides poled across the lagoon.

    Long Way Down

  • Back at Mapula we climbed into log curraghs; canoes that our guides poled across the lagoon.

    Long Way Down

  • Back at Mapula we climbed into log curraghs; canoes that our guides poled across the lagoon.

    Long Way Down

  • Back at Mapula we climbed into log curraghs; canoes that our guides poled across the lagoon.

    Long Way Down

  • He noted too a little ass that was standing beyond the curraghs, sheltering himself where the cliffs hollowed in.

    The King of Ireland's Son

  • On the little beach there were three curraghs in which the island-men went over the sea; they were turned bottom up and heavy stones were placed upon them to prevent their being carried away by the high winds.

    The King of Ireland's Son

  • It was a glad thing for him to be there once more; to recognise each spot he had loved, to look on the old stones and trees, the hills and sparkling sea, the rocky isle and the curraghs of the fisher-folk; to smell the reek of the peat curling up blue in the sweet air; for all these things had haunted him in dreams when he was in a distant land.

    A Child's Book of Saints

  • The whole slip was covered with amass of sobbing animals, with here and there a terrified woman crouching among the bodies and patting some special favourite, to keep it quiet while the curraghs were being launched.

    Synge and the Ireland of His Time

  • He describes the shipping of pigs at Kilronan on the North Island for the English market: 'when the steamer was getting near, the whole drove was moved down upon the slip and the curraghs were carried out close to the sea.

    Synge and the Ireland of His Time

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