Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The quality or state of being customary or usual; habitual use or practice.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Quality of being customary.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The state or quality of being customary.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It was, as a matter of fact, customariness of thought and action and the quintessence of convention that was desired.

    The Titan

  • I am greatly afraid of customariness in this matter.

    Sacramental Discourses

  • If they are dull, dead, and slothful in them, if under the power of customariness and formality, what issue can they expect?

    Pneumatologia

  • He was already ransacking the still faintly-perfumed dining-room for matches, and had just succeeded in relighting the still-warm lamp, when he heard her quiet step in the porch, even felt her peering in, in the gloom, with all her years 'trickling customariness behind her, a little dubious of knocking on a wide-open door.

    The Return

  • It was, as a matter of fact, customariness of thought and action and the quintessence of convention that was desired.

    The Titan

  • 'Serena nox'; and upon perusing again what I have writ in this paper, I finde that I have out of the customariness of that expression my self near the beginning said, And that most serene night, &c.

    Andrew Marvell

  • The transition from morality to customariness seems artificial and very arbitrary.

    Christian Ethics. Volume I.���History of Ethics.

  • Hence the end of customariness is primarily and immediately, not the individual, but the moral whole.

    Christian Ethics. Volume I.���History of Ethics.

  • In customariness the spirit enters into its true reality; the person finds the good outside of himself, as a reality to which he subordinates himself, as a moral world.

    Christian Ethics. Volume I.���History of Ethics.

  • Thus Hegel, deviating from the ordinary usage of language, distinguishes morality [moralität] from customariness [sittlichkeit], conceiving the former as the merely subjective and individual morality, and the latter as civic or social morality.

    Christian Ethics. Volume I.���History of Ethics.

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