Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A variety of chrysoberyl having a shimmering luster and microscopic, needlelike inclusions that reflect a streak of light.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A translucent yellowish chatoyant chrysoberyl.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See chrysoberyl.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Chrysoberyl.

Etymologies

French : Greek kūma, wave, cyma; see cyma + Greek -phanēs, appearing; see -phane.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Ancient Greek κῡμ- (kūm-), the short stem of κῦμα (kūma, "wave") + -ϕανης (-phanēs, "-showing"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The cymophane shows a number of varieties, quite as many as the chrysoberyl, of which it is itself a variety, and these go through the gamut of greens, from a pale white green to the stronger green of asparagus, and through both the grey and yellow greens to dark.

    The Chemistry, Properties and Tests of Precious Stones

  • Another important variety is that of the chrysoberyl called "cymophane."

    The Chemistry, Properties and Tests of Precious Stones

  • He would often spend a whole day settling and resettling in their cases the various stones that be had collected, such as the olive-green chrysoberyl that turns red by lamplight, the cymophane with its wirelike line of silver, the pistachio-coloured peridot, rose-pink and wine-yellow topazes, carbuncles of fiery scarlet with tremulous, four-rayed stars, flame-red cinnamon-stones, orange and violet spinels, and amethysts with their alternate layers of ruby and sapphire.

    The Picture of Dorian Gray

  • He would often spend a whole day settling and resettling in their cases the various stones that he had collected, such as the olive-green chrysoberyl that turns red by lamplight, the cymophane with its wire-like line of silver, the pistachio-colored peridot, rose-pink and wine-yellow topazes, carbuncles of fiery scarlet with tremulous four-rayed stars, flame - red cinnamon-stones, orange and violet spinels, and amethysts with their alternate layers of ruby and sapphire.

    The Picture of Dorian Gray

  • He would often spend a whole day settling and resettling in their cases the various stones that he had collected, such as the olive-green chrysoberyl that turns red by lamp-light, the cymophane with its wire-like line of silver, the pistachio-coloured peridot, rose-pink and wine-yellow topazes, carbuncles of fiery scarlet with tremulous four-rayed stars, flame-red cinnamon-stones, orange and violet spinels, and amethysts with their alternate layers of ruby and sapphire.

    The Picture of Dorian Gray

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