Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of cypress.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Cedars are also called cypresses, though there is also a cypress which is not a cedar, IIRC.

    languagehat.com: HACKMATACK.

  • The trees resembled bushes more than timber, being chiefly small cypresses, which is the prevailing wood.

    Journals of Two Expeditions into the Interior of New South Wales

  • The trees resembled bushes more than timber, being chiefly small cypresses, which is the prevailing wood.

    Journals of Two Expeditions into the Interior of New South Wales

  • Near the cypresses is a fountain, scarcely heard, whose fall is so feeble and slow, that one would be led to call it the clepsydra of this solitude, where time makes so little noise.

    Corinne, Volume 1 (of 2) Or Italy

  • Nearby, opposition militiamen were combing through a dense forest of cypresses.

    Libyan rebels enter Tripoli to topple Muammar Gaddafi's regime

  • In the distance are snow-covered mountains, forests of cypresses and parasol pines.

    The Memory Palace

  • Northeast of Apt, hidden away in Mane, a tiny village between Manosque and Forcalquier, is the Couvent des Minimes, an elegantly restored 17th-century Franciscan convent, surrounded by terraced gardens, cypresses and fruit groves.

    Coasting High in Provence

  • Throughout the cemetery, tombs, crypts, and statues had been cut in half, their contents spilling onto the ruptured stone paths; the sliced-off tops of cypresses and oaks had tumbled onto chunks of broken stone and masonry, their leaves aglow with blue flames.

    Etched in Bone

  • In the distance are snow-covered mountains, forests of cypresses and parasol pines.

    The Memory Palace

  • He liked the cypresses that stretched to the window of his cell, and all along the gravel path that wended over the flat lawn down to where the reeds grew tow-headed at the banks of the streams and the water seemed still and clear on summer days and as rich and foamy as ale in the fall.

    One Year’s Worth of Woe « A Fly in Amber

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.