Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Pertaining to the Czar of Russia.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to the czar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective of, or resembling a czar; tsarish

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He seems to have been adopted by Rossian diplomatists, and those sanguine of Rossian _destiny_, as a most convenient defender of czarish ambition -- the more so that they found in him a revealer of things never thought of by the czar; as for instance, liberality and even democracy in Great Rossia, on the plains of Okka and

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 6, No 2, August, 1864 Devoted to Literature and National Policy

  • Czar with garrisons of stationary soldiers, to protect the caravans and defend the country against the Tartars, who would otherwise make it very dangerous travelling; and his czarish majesty has given such strict orders for the well guarding the caravans, that, if there are any Tartars heard of in the country, detachments of the garrison are always sent to see the travellers safe from station to station.

    The Further Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

  • But the Democrats wish to see these czarish pretentions extended over most of the American economy.

    Elections - fresh news by plazoo.com

  • After we had passed this desert we came into a country pretty well inhabited - that is to say, we found towns and castles, settled by the Czar with garrisons of stationary soldiers, to protect the caravans and defend the country against the Tartars, who would otherwise make it very dangerous travelling; and his czarish majesty has given such strict orders for the well guarding the caravans, that, if there are any Tartars heard of in the country, detachments of the garrison are always sent to see the travellers safe from station to station.

    The Further Adventures Of Robinson Crusoe

  • After we had passed this desert we came into a country pretty well inhabited-that is to say, we found towns and castles, settled by the Czar with garrisons of stationary soldiers, to protect the caravans and defend the country against the Tartars, who would otherwise make it very dangerous travelling; and his czarish majesty has given such strict orders for the well guarding the caravans, that, if there are any Tartars heard of in the country, detachments of the garrison are always sent to see the travellers safe from station to station.

    The Further Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

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