Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of dabchick.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Wrybills (Anarhynchus frontalis) winter in this ecoregion in large tidal harbors but are otherwise resident on the South Island while New Zealand dabchicks (Poliocephalus rufopectus VU) are normally found on coastal lakes.

    Northland temperate kauri forests

  • Moorhens plopped, and dabchicks scooted, insects rowed and skated.

    Cider With Rosie

  • You can count thirty or forty coots, besides moorhens and a dozen dabchicks or so, and at the end where the mill stands there are fat duck and a bevy of swans.

    Highways and Byways in Surrey

  • It is an arresting picture, the long, clear surface, the coots with their white foreheads dabbling in the weeds or rushing after one another with loud splashings, the dabchicks diving six at a time out of sight, and the dignified swans breasting the flowing water under the red brick and lichens of the mill.

    Highways and Byways in Surrey

  • The water runs with the deep sparkle of cut glass; forget-me-nots grow about it, and reed mace, and figwort and bittersweet; waterhens wander in the shaven grass of its brim, and dabchicks go plump in the current like cricket-balls.

    Highways and Byways in Surrey

  • Otters, kingfishers, dabchicks, moorhens, all of them about all day long and always wanting you to do something — as if a fellow had no business of his own to attend to! '

    The Wind in the Willows

  • Otters, kingfishers, dabchicks, moorhens, all of them about all day long and always wanting you to do something -- as if a fellow had no business of his own to attend to! '

    The Wind in the Willows

  • Moorhens, coots and dabchicks are abundant; the reed-sparrow is heard only in a few districts.

    Hertfordshire

  • Otters, kingfishers, dabchicks, moorhens, all of them about all day long and always wanting you to DO something -- as if a fellow had no business of his own to attend to! '

    The Wind in the Willows

  • The sedge fringe in the shallows, the "haunt of coot and tern" elsewhere, and of hosts of moorhens and dabchicks on the now protected river, is mainly composed of the giant rush, smooth and round, which the water-rats cut down and peel to eat the pith.

    The Naturalist on the Thames

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