Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A dirk-knife.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The two young men carried in addition, in their belts, a sort of dagger-knife, which is known in Brazil as a “foca,” and which hunters do not hesitate to use when attacking the ounce and other wild animals which, if not very formidable, are pretty numerous in these forests.

    Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon

  • I had brought with me a fine fish, caught that morning from the rocks, which I had sealed and cleaned with my dagger-knife, and I now toasted it over the hot coals, after which I enjoyed the most satisfying meal I had tasted since I had been cast upon the island.

    Adventures in Southern Seas A Tale of the Sixteenth Century

  • Anna, were taken from me, but to my great good fortune they did not rob me of my dagger-knife, or my flint and steel which lay concealed in the inner pocket of my leathern belt, nor of a lock of Anna's hair which I carried in a silken bag round my neck; and in the possession of which I found much comfort in my present predicament.

    Adventures in Southern Seas A Tale of the Sixteenth Century

  • The two young men carried in addition, in their belts, a sort of dagger-knife, which is known in Brazil as a _ "foca," _ and which hunters do not hesitate to use when attacking the ounce and other wild animals which, if not very formidable, are pretty numerous in these forests.

    Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon

  • With vainest regret he remembered the long-bladed dagger-knife he had when a boy carried always in his pocket.

    Heather and Snow

  • In the midst was a dead bustard, also an Englishman sitting up, with his head bleeding; Jean was on foot, with her dagger-knife in one hand, and holding fast to her breast her beloved hawk, whose jesses were, however, grasped by one of the foresters.

    Two Penniless Princesses

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