Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of daric.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Alexander must have appreciated the additional gift of thousands of minted gold coins commonly known as darics that depicted the first Great King Darius as an archer.

    Alexander the Great

  • Alexander must have appreciated the additional gift of thousands of minted gold coins commonly known as darics that depicted the first Great King Darius as an archer.

    Alexander the Great

  • Alexander must have appreciated the additional gift of thousands of minted gold coins commonly known as darics that depicted the first Great King Darius as an archer.

    Alexander the Great

  • His "darics," as they were called by the Greeks, were, in the first instance, gold coins of a rude type, a little heavier than our sovereigns, weighing between 123 and 124 grains troy. [

    History of Phoenicia

  • Here Cyrus summoned Silanus, his Ambraciot soothsayer, and presented him with three thousand darics; because eleven days back, when sacrificing, he had told him that the king would not fight within ten days, and Cyrus had answered: “Well, then, if he does not fight within that time, he will not fight at all; and if your prophecy comes true, I promise you ten talents.”

    Anabasis

  • Working on the feelings of that prince, in language described elsewhere, he received from his entertainer a present of ten thousand darics.

    Anabasis

  • Xenophon, and were kind enough to repurchase the horse he had sold in Lampsacus for fifty darics; suspecting that he had parted with it out of need, and hearing that he was fond of the beast they restored it to him, refusing to be remunerated.

    Anabasis

  • When I was in banishment he honoured me in various ways, and made me also a present of ten thousand darics.

    Anabasis

  • I watched the money changer's hands sift through darics from Persia, coins from Sicily, from Libya, from Ionia.

    Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine

  • Once when some were offering him one thing, some another, as he was on a progress, a certain poor laborer, having got nothing at hand to bring him, ran to the river side, and, taking up water in his hands, offered it to him; with which Artaxerxes was so well pleased that he sent him a goblet of gold and a thousand darics.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

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