Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the past; bygone days (nostalgic)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There was, in days of yore and in ages and times long gone before, a puissant King among the Kings of China, the crown of crowned heads, who ruled over many men of war and vassals with wisdom and justice, might and majesty; equitable to his Ryots, liberal to his lieges and dearly beloved by the hearts of his subjects.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • There was once in days of yore and in ages and times long gone before a man and a merchant Masrúr hight, who was of the comeliest of the folk of his tide, a wight of wealth galore and in easiest case; but he loved to take his pleasure in vergiers and flower-gardens and to divert himself with the love of the fair.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • There lived once in the days of yore and the good old times long gone before, in the land of Khorasan, a merchant called Majd al-Dín, who had great wealth and many slaves and servants, white and black, young and old; but he had not been blessed with a child until he reached the age of threescore, when Almighty Allah vouchsafed him a son, whom he named Alí Shár.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Know, O thou Ifrit, that in days of yore and in ages long gone before, a King called Yunan reigned over the city of Fars of the land of the Roum. 78 He was a powerful ruler and a wealthy, who had armies and guards and allies of all nations of men; but his body was afflicted with a leprosy which leaches and men of science failed to heal.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • There was once in days of yore and in ages and times long gone before in the parts of Cairo, a merchant named Táj al-Dín who was of the most considerable of the merchants and of the chiefs of the freeborn.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • There was once, in days of yore and in ages and times long gone before, in the city of Baghdad, a fisherman, by name Khalíf, a man of muckle talk and little luck.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • There was once in days of yore and in ages and times long gone before, in Ajam-land a King Shahrimán302 hight, whose abiding place was

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • There was once in days of yore and in ages and times long gone before, in the land of Hind, a mighty King, tall of presence and fair of favour and goodly of parts, noble of nature and generous, beneficent to the poor and loving to his lieges and all the people of his realm.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • It hath reached me, O august King, that in days of yore and in times and ages long gone before, during the Caliphate of Harun al-Rashid, there was a merchant who named his son Abú al-Hasan174 Ali bin Táhir; and the same was great of goods and grace, while his son was fair of form and face and held in favour by all folk.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

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