Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Alternative spelling of deadborn.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction, as even to excite a murmur among the zealots."

    John Paul Rollert: The Great Infidel at 300

  • Hume was disappointed with the reception of the Treatise, which "fell dead-born from the press," as he put it, and so tried again to disseminate his ideas to the public by writing a shorter and more polemical work.

    Archive 2009-03-01

  • "It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction, as even to excite a murmur among the zealots."

    John Paul Rollert: The Great Infidel at 300

  • Hume was disappointed with the reception of the Treatise, which "fell dead-born from the press," as he put it, and so tried again to disseminate his ideas to the public by writing a shorter and more polemical work.

    Capsule Summaries of the Great Books of the Western World

  • It was a dead-born idea, and yet here it is, still wasting time, still wasting money, still wasting Democratic strength, and still tormenting a bunch of well-meaning supporters with something that's just not to be.

    McAuliffe debunks AP report

  • Wollstonecraft on her death-bed had "nothing to communicate" about the care of her two daughters; or the many references in the press after 1805 that Godwin's writings fall "dead-born" from the press.

    Notes on 'Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality'

  • The Treatise was no literary sensation, but it didn't “fall dead-born from the press,” as Hume disappointedly described its reception.

    David Hume

  • There was now a distinct manifestation of morning in the air, and presently the bleared white visage of a sunless winter day emerged like a dead-born child.

    The Woodlanders

  • Prosecution excites the public regard, and a curiosity that will not rest till it is gratified, towards that which, under silent neglect, would hardly gain attention; if indeed, it did not drop quite dead-born from the press.

    A Sketch of the Life of the late Henry Cooper Barrister-at-Law, of the Norfolk Circuit; as also, of his Father

  • David Hume was thirty-one years of age when he published (1742) the first series of his essays; and his _Treatise of Human Nature_ which had fallen "dead-born from the press" was in some sort compensated by the success of the new work.

    Political Thought in England from Locke to Bentham

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