Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A man employed in decoying wild fowl.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A man in charge of a decoy or of several decoys for luring birds, animals, etc.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • While the decoy-man was busy showing the new works, he was alarmed with a great cry about this house for “Help! help!” and away he ran like the wind, guessing, as we supposed, that something was catched in the trap.

    From London to Land's End

  • The decoy-man never looked healthy, but now he seemed ghastly of aspect and exceedingly weak, as he leaned upon the tall staff he held in his hand.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • At another time ordinary tackle would be rigged up, and Dave would take them to some dark hole where fish were known to swarm, and for hours the decoy-man would sit and watch patiently while the three companions pulled up the various denizens of the mere.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • Sound travels easily over water, and the decoy-man must have heard the hail, but he paid no heed, only kept on poling his punt along, thrusting down the long ash sapling, which the fen-men used as punt-pole, staff, and leaping-pole in turn; and then as the boat glided on, standing erect in her bows like some statue.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • What Tom called sparks were glowing flakes of fire which floated on, glittering against the black sky, and so furiously was the fire burning that it seemed as if something far more than the hut and stacks of the decoy-man must be ablaze.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • "Quick, in wi 'ye, lads!" cried the decoy-man, with his whole manner changed.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • Here another buoyed bait was left, and then they went on to lay another and another, the old decoy-man, with the knowledge bought by very long experience, selecting choice spots till the whole set were disposed of in the course of an hour, over a space far exceeding a mile.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • "Nay, lad, I d'know," said the decoy-man; "all I say is that it be a girt lungeing pike o 'some kind."

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • Dick wanted no second invitation, and the decoy-man sent the punt along rapidly, and by following one of the lanes of water pursued a devious course toward Grimsey, whose blackened ruins now began to come into sight.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • No word was spoken, and in the dim wood with the rustling increasing, the scene in some way suggested to Dick the fen during the night when he was listening to the passing of the punt -- evidently Dave's -- and he fell a-wondering whether the decoy-man was now far away on the other side of the mere.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

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