Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. aberration of the mind; delirium

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Aberration of mind; delirium.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Mental aberration; delirium; dementation.

Etymologies

Latin deliratio. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Caucus challenges Vavi to point out any �untouchable deadwood� within the cabinet and provide evidence of any deliration of duty by any deceased or current serving minister.

    ANC Caucus Statement On Zwelinzima Vavi

  • Caucus challenges Vavi to point out any "untouchable deadwood" within the cabinet and provide evidence of any deliration of duty by any deceased or current serving minister.

    ANC Daily News Briefing

  • Their immense and sandy diffuseness is like the prairie or the desert, and their incongruities are like the last deliration.

    Representative Men

  • The rule, Sic vos non vobis, never altogether to be got rid of in men’s Industry, now presses with such incubus weight, that Industry must shake it off, or utterly be strangled under it; and, alas, can as yet but gasp and rave, and aimlessly struggle, like one in the final deliration.

    Paras. 20-39

  • Distraction surely, incipience of the “final deliration” enters upon the poor old English Formulism that has called itself for some two centuries a Church.

    The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1834-1872, Vol. I

  • Their immense and sandy diffuseness is like the prairie, or the desert, and their incongruities are like the last deliration.

    Representative Man (1850)

  • It was on Saturday night that he, drawing his last life-breaths, gave up the ghost there; -- leaving a world, which would never go to his mind, now broken out, seemingly, into deliration and the culbute generale.

    The French Revolution

  • Distraction surely, incipience of the "final deliration" enters upon the poor old English Formulism that has called itself for some two centuries a Church.

    The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1834-1872, Vol. I

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