Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Roman antiquity, a temple or sanctuary, by some scholars believed to have contained a basin or fountain in which persons coming to sacrifice washed. But the actual distinction between delubrum and templum is uncertain.
  • n. In eccles. arch., a church furnished with a font.
  • n. A font or baptismal basin.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A high brow like unto the bright heavens, coeli pulcherrima plaga, Frons ubi vivit honor, frons ubi ludit amor, white and smooth like the polished alabaster, a pair of cheeks of vermilion colour, in which love lodgeth; [4914] Amor qui mollibus genis puellae pernoctas: a coral lip, suaviorum delubrum, in which

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Massa is an ancient city, the fame of whose celebrated temple (delubrum) of Juno

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • His credulity is shewn by the belief he held, that the name of a place called Ainnit in Sky was the same as the Anaitidis delubrum in Lydia.

    Life Of Johnson

  • M'Queen had laid stress on the name given to the place by the country people, Ainnit; and added, 'I knew not what to make of this piece of antiquity, till I met with the Anaitidis delubrum in Lydia, mentioned by Pausanias and the elder Pliny.'

    The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

  • His credulity is shewn by the belief he held, that the name of a place called Ainnit in Sky was the same as the _Anaitidis delubrum_ in Lydia.

    Life of Johnson, Volume 2 1765-1776

  • M’Queen had laid stress on the name given to the place by the country people, Ainnit; and added, ‘I knew not what to make of this piece of antiquity, till I met with the Anaitidis delubrum in Lydia, mentioned by Pausanias and the elder Pliny.’

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • Mr. M'Queen had laid stress on the name given to the place by the country people, ” Ainnit; and added, 'I knew not what to make of this piece of antiquity, till I met with the Anaitidis delubrum in Lydia, mentioned by Pausanias and the elder Pliny.'

    Life of Johnson

  • The relations of the missionaries, who visited Tartary in the thirteenth century, (see the seventh volume of the Histoire des Voyages,) express the popular language and opinions; Zingis is styled the son of God, &c. &c.] [Footnote 8: Nec templum apud eos visitur, aut delubrum, ne tugurium quidem culmo tectum cerni usquam potest; sed gladius Barbarico ritu humi figitur nudus, eumque ut Martem regionum quas circumcircant praesulem verecundius colunt.

    History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire — Volume 3

  • The relations of the missionaries, who visited Tartary in the thirteenth century, (see the seventh volume of the Histoire des Voyages,) express the popular language and opinions; Zingis is styled the son of God, &c. &c.] 8 Nec templum apud eos visitur, aut delubrum, ne tugurium quidem culmo tectum cerni usquam potest; sed gladius Barbarico ritu humi figitur nudus, eumque ut Martem regionum quas circumcircant praesulem verecundius colunt.

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.