Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An obsolete form of distance.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • "Some destance up" Camped at a point on the L.S. opposit the head of the Island, our party was incamped on the Opposit Side, their not answering our Signals Caused us to Suspect the persons Camped opposit to us was a war party of Soux, we fired the Bow piece to alarm the party on Shore, ailed prepared to oppose if attacted

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • E Side is 397 yards wide, the destance between the two rivers at the pt. of high Land (ioo foot above the bottom) and 80 poles up the

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • This last River is 150 yards wide at it's Mouth and 100 a Short destance up the water of a light Muddy

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • North side of the river is one of the most beautifull plains we have yet seen, it rises gradually from the river bottom to the hight of 50 or 60 feet, then becoming level as a bowling green, extends back as far as the eye can reach; on the S. side the river hills are more broken and much higher tho 'some little destance back the country becomes level and fertile. no appearance of birnt hills coal or pumicestone, that of salts still continue. vegitation appears to have advanced very little since the 28th.

    Original journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1804-1806

  • A.M. the wind became so hard that we were compelled to ly by for several hours, one of the small canoes by the bad management of the steersman filled with water and had very nearly sunk; we unloaded her and dryed the baggage; at one we proceed on the wind having in some measure abated. the country we passed today on the North side of the river is one of the most beautifull plains we have yet seen, it rises gradually from the river bottom to the hight of 50 or 60 feet, then becoming level as a bowling green. extends back as far as the eye can reach; on the S. side the river hills are more broken and much higher tho some little destance back the country becomes level and fertile. no appearance of birnt hills coal or pumicestone, that of salts still continue. vegitation appears to have advanced very little since the

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

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