Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A fine, powdered diatomaceous earth used in industry as a filler, a filtering agent, an absorbent, a clarifier, and an insulator.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Diatomaceous earth; infusorial earth.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun geology A fine, powdery earth formed from the skeletons of diatoms

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a light soil consisting of siliceous diatom remains and often used as a filtering material

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • These materials (such as diatomite, pumice, expanded clay and shale, etc.) may be used in place of perlite without losing any of the benefits that perlite provides.

    Perlite

  • Sediment from the years when the drill site was covered by open ocean are made of diatoms, tiny marine plankton ( "diatomite").

    undefined

  • Such layers, or beds, of diatoms are called diatomaceous earth, or diatomite.

    Diatomite

  • The United States produces much of its own diatomite material.

    Diatomite

  • Similarly, diatomite is used to filter impurities from water to produce drinkable (potable) water in public water systems.

    Diatomite

  • Of these states, California and Nevada produce the largest amount of diatomite.

    Diatomite

  • Significant producers of diatomite worldwide include France, China, Denmark, Russia, and Algeria.

    Diatomite

  • In this situation, the diatomite removes bacteria and protozoa.

    Diatomite

  • Some lightweight mineral and rock materials, such as vermiculite, diatomite and perlite are similar to micas and can be used in place of mica.

    Mica

  • The oldest use of diatomite is as a very mild abrasive and for this purpose has been used in toothpaste and metal polishes.

    Diatomite

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.