Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having dim sight; lacking perception.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having greatly reduced vision

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Yefrem, nicknamed the Mole, a little, bent man with a sharp nose and dim-sighted eyes.

    The Inn

  • But I need not have used all that caution, for the old gentleman was grown dim-sighted by some distemper which had fallen upon his eyes, and could but just see well enough to walk about, and not run against a tree or into a ditch.

    Moll Flanders

  • The hybris, said by some to be the same as the eagle-owl, is never seen by daylight, as it is dim-sighted, but during the night it hunts like the eagle; it will fight the eagle with such desperation that the two combatants are often captured alive by shepherds; it lays two eggs, and, like others we have mentioned, it builds on rocks and in caverns.

    The History of Animals

  • It is dim-sighted in the day-time, but sees well enough by night.

    The History of Animals

  • By reason of which infirmity he was not able so distinctly and clearly to discern the points and blots of the dice as formerly he had been accustomed to do; whence it might very well have happened, said he, as old dim-sighted Isaac took Jacob for

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • Dim-witted, dim-sighted, or maybe just very smart, she thought.

    For Love of Mother-Not

  • Talmudists speak much, and hyperbolically enough: which nevertheless they confess to be turned long since into miserable barrenness; but are dim-sighted as to the true cause of it.

    From the Talmud and Hebraica

  • And you will the more easily give credit to this, when you shall have observed how the disciples of Christ themselves, that conversed a long time with him, were dim-sighted, likewise, in this very thing.

    From the Talmud and Hebraica

  • The Greeks used the name of Kronos in compounds and derivatives to mean dim-sighted, senile foolishness, nonsense, antiquated ideas.

    PRIMITIVISM

  • This blindness has so fascinated our eyes, as to make us appear like owls that become dim-sighted when the light of truth is seen.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 1

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