Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the quality of being directive

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Frequency of directiveness may be mainly a matter of personality; frequency of participation may hinge mainly on contingent factors.

    The Bass Handbook of Leadership

  • If the power of leaders is suddenly increased in an experiment, the amount the leaders can be directive is also increased, and in fact the leaders do tend to increase their directiveness Shiflett, 1973.

    The Bass Handbook of Leadership

  • In such bureaucratic organizations, powerful leaders were more participative because the rules and procedures required directiveness, and only executives with more power could be participative if they chose to be.

    The Bass Handbook of Leadership

  • Immelt emphasized consensual management and teamwork in his directiveness Hymowitz, 2003.

    The Bass Handbook of Leadership

  • A cognitive trait that is linked to inner directiveness and inner control is field independence.

    The Bass Handbook of Leadership

  • That integral directiveness is given specific (albeit highly general) articulation in principles such as the injunction to love one's neighbor as oneself; or the Golden Rule of doing for others what you would want them to do for you and not doing to others what you would not have them do to you; or the

    Natural Law Theories

  • Such first principles of practical reasoning direct one to actions and dispositions and arrangements that promote such intelligible goods, and that directiveness or normativity is expressed by “I should ¦” or “I ought ¦” in senses which although truly normative are only incipiently moral.

    Natural Law Theories

  • And what practical reasonableness requires seems to be that each of the basic human goods be treated as what it truly is: a basic reason for action amongst other basic reasons whose integral directiveness is not to be cut down or deflected by subrational passions.

    Aquinas' Moral, Political, and Legal Philosophy

  • There could be no normativity, no practical (choice-guiding) directiveness, unless free choices were really possible.

    Aquinas' Moral, Political, and Legal Philosophy

  • Contributors with academic or professional credentials (i.e., they've actually created games or published useful papers about gaming) are assigned high directiveness (they can initiate threads, for example), while the wannabes, hangers-on, and occasional l33t interlopers are assigned low directiveness.

    Dead Monsters and Naked Emperors

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