Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of disburden.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He never replied, though once he went to the extent of disburdening his mind to half a dozen reporters.

    Chapter VII

  • During the process of disburdening them I was accustomed to explaining my side of the case, but I soon gave this over.

    The Golden Poppy

  • Unprepared to fight on two continents under these circumstances, Napoleon conceived the masterstroke of disburdening himself, selling not only New Orleans but the entire, immense Louisiana Territory for a pittance—$15 million, or less than three cents per acre.

    The Chosen Peoples

  • Unprepared to fight on two continents under these circumstances, Napoleon conceived the masterstroke of disburdening himself, selling not only New Orleans but the entire, immense Louisiana Territory for a pittance—$15 million, or less than three cents per acre.

    The Chosen Peoples

  • Unprepared to fight on two continents under these circumstances, Napoleon conceived the masterstroke of disburdening himself, selling not only New Orleans but the entire, immense Louisiana Territory for a pittance—$15 million, or less than three cents per acre.

    The Chosen Peoples

  • We find the same disburdening procedure in the Biblical scapegoat and the self-sacrificial death of the Christian Redeemer . [emphasis added]

    The Stain of Sin

  • There was a moment during this discourse, when Halbert had well-nigh come to the resolution of disburdening his own breast, by intrusting

    The Monastery

  • We find the same disburdening procedure in the Biblical scapegoat and the self-sacrificial death of the Christian Redeemer . [emphasis added]

    Archive 2006-02-01

  • That this is not therefore the disburdening of a particular fancy, but the common grievance of all those who had prepared their minds and studies above the vulgar pitch to advance truth in others, and from others to entertain it, thus much may satisfy.

    Areopagitica

  • That this is not therefore the disburdening of a particular fancy, but the common grievance of all those who had prepared their minds and studies above the vulgar pitch to advance truth in others, and from others to entertain it, thus much may satisfy.

    Areopagitica

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