Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of disguise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I've seen the "big state" argument and its many variations and thin disguises so many times in this Ticker now that I could puke.

    Why West Virginians turned out for Clinton

  • I suspect the name calling disguises an inability to really engage ideas.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Finkelstein Affair:

  • Donning another of his thin disguises, he wrote to Taylor as "Percey Green," enclosing a simple ballad "like a name without a title" (CL 248-49).

    Like

  • She is young, seems serious about her work, and loyally refuses to criticise her bosses, but her many-worded job title disguises the fact that she runs a department of one - herself - which until 2008 had seven to 10 staff.

    The Guardian World News

  • The "undervalued" tag disguises another truth; poetry consistently spearheads the most transformative force every cultural history attests to: the power of the word.

    Travis Nichols: The Poetry Feminaissance

  • The "undervalued" tag disguises another truth; poetry consistently spearheads the most transformative force every cultural history attests to: the power of the word.

    Travis Nichols: The Poetry Feminaissance

  • Diners at the Amsterdam Cafe A three-minute walk south of the square is the Corporate Hotel, whose boring name disguises the fact that its roof is a great place for sundowners when the weather warms, with views that stretch into the green hills.

    After Hours: Ulan Bator

  • Among his disguises were a cart-pusher, a Gestapo SS officer, a nun (top row), a street-sweeper, a one-eyed peddler, and a mailman (bottom row).

    Archive 2009-03-22

  • The standard scientific explanation was trial and error—a reasonable term that may well account for certain innovations—but at another level, as Schultes came to realize on spending more time in the forest, it is a euphemism which disguises the fact that ethnobotanists have very little idea how Indians originally made their discoveries.

    One River

  • The standard scientific explanation was trial and error—a reasonable term that may well account for certain innovations—but at another level, as Schultes came to realize on spending more time in the forest, it is a euphemism which disguises the fact that ethnobotanists have very little idea how Indians originally made their discoveries.

    One River

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