Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A collar for a dog.
  • n. An ornamental band or collar made of metal, beads, velvet, etc., and worn close round the throat by women.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Or is it wearing one of those awesome dog-collar chokers?

    Once in a Lifetime Wrecks

  • Frank and a short, tubby man with a clerical dog-collar were cozily poring over a mass of tattered paper on the desk by the far wall.

    Sick Cycle Carousel

  • I am now going to invest in any company that makes American flag dog-collar pins.

    Associated Press: Pet Owners Prefer McCain To "Petless" Obama

  • Then, another, equally bizarre sermon was delivered by a visiting cleric who told the congregation a story about how he had been on a train and had taken the trouble to smile at a young woman who was wearing a hijab, just to show that although he was wearing a dog-collar, he was by no means an Islamophobe.

    On Thursday, the Legg report will be published along with...

  • Second, the astute young lady, on spotting the dog-collar and instinctively realising the imminent peril of its wearer, asked the obvious question.

    Are you saved, Vicar? « Anglican Samizdat

  • When Émile-Maurice died, in 1951, having added such classics to the company repertoire as the Hermès silk scarf, in 1937 (it grew out of Hermès racing silks), and the Collier de Chien, in the 40s (the cultish dog-collar bracelet, a waiting-list item today), son-in-law Robert Dumas took the helm, working in close collaboration with his brother-in-law Jean-René Guerrand.

    From Hermes to Eternity

  • Sending in Representative Don Sherwood with spiked gloves, a dog-collar and actionable intelligence that Zarqawi was really his 29-year old mistress.

    06/16/2006

  • Nobody chanted things after the vicar said stuff, and the "vicar" himself shocked me considerably (!!) because there he was without a dog-collar in sight, wanting to be called "Rob" and not anything that would set him apart, wearing blue jeans and holding his three-day-old firstborn son, and seeming like the most normal man around.

    sheepdip Diary Entry

  • Although I couldn't tell what the old boy with the dog-collar under his uniform was saying, I hoped he was making reference to the shite-hawks and the beetles, and having a word to say about how the tropics are much better than cold climates at setting life and death slap up against one another, practically in a copulating position.

    A Rude Awakening

  • Cæsar on a dog-collar too hastily inferred to have been worn by a canine pet of the great dictator.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. October, 1878.

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