Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Describing an experiment (usually medical) in which the identity of those conducting the test(s) is kept secret from both the subjects and the administrators until the outcome of the experiment is known.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Experimenters often use what is called a double-blind procedure to assure the validity of their data.

    INSIDE OF A DOG

  • Experimenters often use what is called a double-blind procedure to assure the validity of their data.

    INSIDE OF A DOG

  • If neither the women participating in the study nor the health professionals working with them know which group each woman is in, the study is called double-blind.

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

  • If neither the women participating in the study nor the health professionals working with them know which group each woman is in, the study is called double-blind.

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

  • If neither the women participating in the study nor the health professionals working with them know which group each woman is in, the study is called double-blind.

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

  • If neither the women participating in the study nor the health professionals working with them know which group each woman is in, the study is called double-blind.

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

  • The mistake rate, however, fell to 12 per cent in the so-called "double-blind sequential" line-ups.

    The Independent - Frontpage RSS Feed

  • Complicating the issue is the fact that many believe a gold-standard study would be unethical: How could you carry out what’s called a double-blind study of a large group of children—randomly assigning half to be immunized and half not, leaving the second group of kids vulnerable to serious and often deadly diseases?

    You Raising Your Child

  • Complicating the issue is the fact that many believe a gold-standard study would be unethical: How could you carry out what’s called a double-blind study of a large group of children—randomly assigning half to be immunized and half not, leaving the second group of kids vulnerable to serious and often deadly diseases?

    You Raising Your Child

  • Complicating the issue is the fact that many believe a gold-standard study would be unethical: How could you carry out what’s called a double-blind study of a large group of children—randomly assigning half to be immunized and half not, leaving the second group of kids vulnerable to serious and often deadly diseases?

    You Raising Your Child

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