Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Like a dowdy; frumpy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Like a dowdy.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Like a dowdy; somewhat dowdy.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

dowdy +‎ -ish

Examples

  • Who was to distinguish her, Mrs. Juliet St. Leger Temple, from the fat, dowdyish, over-dressed, gaudy Mrs. Temple, who wore a wig, and whose eyes squinted?

    Hubert's Wife A Story for You

  • But it was not an easy thing to face a whole schoolroom full of girls and boys -- and most of them strangers to her -- looking so "dowdyish."

    Ruth Fielding of the Red Mill Or, Jasper Parloe's Secret

  • "Who is that person coming up the lane?" asked Loveday, her attention suddenly attracted by a tall, thin figure, dressed in shabby black, with a large, dowdyish bonnet, and carrying a basket in her hand as if she were returning from some errand.

    The Experiences of Loveday Brooke, Lady Detective

  • They did not dress well: one looked rustic; another was dowdyish; a third was over-fine; a fourth was insignificant.

    Gala-days

  • Ralph, though wise beyond his years, and one who, in a thought borrowed in part from Ovid, we may say, could rather compute them by events than ordinary time, wanted yet considerably in that wholesome, though rather dowdyish virtue, which men call prudence.

    Guy Rivers: A Tale of Georgia

  • These girls were all dressed in black gowns, with white aprons and neckerchiefs, and white linen caps on their heads, -- a very dowdyish attire, and well suited to their figures.

    Passages from the English Notebooks, Volume 1.

  • They search for meaning, order, fame, and transcendence in dowdyish party scenes of empty fabulousness and joyless desperation.

    Bookslut

  • Reuter appear dowdyish and commonplace compared with the splendid charms of some of her pupils?”

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

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