Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to doxology.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pertaining to doxology; giving praise to God.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to or of the nature of a doxology; giving praise to God.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the tradition of the church before rationalism seeped into the groundwater of the debate, inerrancy language was doxological in nature.

    The Last Gasp of Inerrancy

  • After the example of Zwingli though his approach to the nexus between Word and Spirit has problems of its own, the doxological use, not just of inerrancy language, but of other forms of "love-language" for scripture is the sign of a healthy theology.

    The Last Gasp of Inerrancy

  • It is seems to me that descriptive theological discourse is, at its best, doxological.

    The Last Gasp of Inerrancy

  • The argument is conducted through an analysis and rejection of the Derridean interpretation of this work, that is, Pickstock contends against Derrida that Plato assumed that language was primarily doxological in character, ‘ultimately concerned with praise of the divine’21, and therefore liturgical.

    Mystical Theology and the Liturgical Consummation of Philosophy

  • Her argument is that Plato operated with a doxological view of language, and that a recovery of this is essential for the health of Christian society.

    Mystical Theology and the Liturgical Consummation of Philosophy

  • It is not just that credal material is absorbed into liturgy; the credal material itself has a strongly doxological character, most evident perhaps in the 341 Antiochene text but by no means absent from the 325 statement of faith, which has a slightly perfunctory allusion to the biblical titles of the Logos.

    The Creed and the Eucharist in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität, Bonn

  • Indeed, it may even seem surprising that some of the most important formulae – such as the creed of Nicaea itself – reflect relatively little of the doxological idiom we have been examining.

    The Creed and the Eucharist in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität, Bonn

  • It cannot be denied but that they had their petitionary or supplicatory prayers; but then, the benedictory or doxological prayers were more in number, and more large and copious: especially those which were poured out occasionally or upon present emergency.

    From the Talmud and Hebraica

  • A study of these, and a comparison of them with one another, would amply repay the pains bestowed upon it; above all, if it served to remind us of the prominence which the doxological element assumes in the highest worship of the Church, the very subordinate place which it oftentimes takes in ours.

    Epistles to the Seven Churches in Asia.

  • The first is that the theological and doxological claims against it, once held with unanimity, are not even discussed by cremation proponents.

    Crosswalk.com - Home

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