Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having the character of a drab or low wench.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Somewhat drab in color.
  • adj. Having the character of a drab or low wench.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having the qualities of a drab; sluttish.
  • Somewhat of the color of drab.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

drab +‎ -ish

Examples

  • This was a thin-faced, spare-figured man of middle age and stature, dressed in a dusty drabbish-coloured suit, such as I never saw before.

    American Notes for General Circulation

  • The sudden return of movement and familiar noises, and our natural anxiety about ourselves (our clothes were still dreadfully hot, and the fronts of the thighs of Gibberne's white trousers were scorched a drabbish brown), prevented the minute observations I should have liked to make on all these things.

    The Country of the Blind, and Other Stories

  • Short, although not quite so short as Carrissima, she had a thickset but flat figure, and a conscientious objection to make her drabbish-coloured hair appear more plentiful than it was.

    Enter Bridget

  • Her gown, which was invariably of some greyish, drabbish, neutral-tinted material, always cocked up a little in front to show two large, flat, soft-looking feet.

    Prisoners Fast Bound In Misery And Iron

  • For one, instead of the drabbish woman she had expected, Mrs. Hall saw a pale, dark-eyed, ladylike creature, whose personality ruled her attire rather than was ruled by it.

    Wessex Tales

  • The thick drabbish yellow moustache was what arrested decision in either direction, and the prompt vigour of all his movements was that of a young man of thirty, which was really Walker's age.

    The Rise of Silas Lapham

  • Straight, drabbish hair, pale eyes, and a wide, thin-lipped mouth were not personal charms, though they belonged to an exemplary man; neither were vanity and a timid regard for appearances, traits particularly calculated to master Margaret's soul.

    The Woman's Advocate.

  • Do you mark this {girl} whom he speaks of, as dirty and drabbish?

    The Comedies of Terence Literally Translated into English Prose, with Notes

  • The sudden return of movement and familiar noises, and our natural anxiety about ourselves (our clothe’s were still dreadfully hot, and the fronts of the thighs of Gibberne’s white trousers were scorched a drabbish brown), prevented the minute observations I should have liked to make on all these things.

    Twelve Stories and a Dream, by H. G. Wells

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