Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. pale, lacking color.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The former were drabby-looking creatures, stained in face with oil and dust, clad in thin, shapeless, cotton dresses and shod with more or less worn shoes.

    Sister Carrie

  • The ground-colour is a pale drabby stone-colour, and all about the large end is a broad dense zone of dull brownish purple.

    The Nests and Eggs of Indian Birds, Volume 1

  • Rifles were cocked, and every eye carefully scrutinised the dry drabby-yellow grass through which the lion would be stealing its way, and so much like the withered stems in colour that, unless moving, it was quite possible to miss seeing such a creature as they rode along.

    Off to the Wilds Being the Adventures of Two Brothers

  • One of them I thought very pretty, and I was standing staring at it, when all at once I saw that a big drabby woman had poked herself in between Bessie and me.

    Adela Cathcart, Volume 3

  • A sense of pride permeated the afternoon, with the franchise and the fans eager to show off their very own ballpark after being so embarrassed by the drabby Metrodome for nearly three decades.

    SI.com

  • Overall, I found "Robin Hood" to be a little too drabby, but with its intentions to "keep it real" in the setting of the late 1190's, the look of the film would tend to have a faded out color palette.

    Home Theater Forum

  • Thinking, we must be close to the basilica, we turned the corner and there it was: the massive, white stone side of the onion-domed church barely standing out in the drabby gray sky.

    TravelPod.com TravelStream™ — Recent Entries at TravelPod.com

  • For some reason, I felt that the past winter had been particular long and drabby and cold.

    BC Bloggers

  • Oh, forgot though: Askew brown drabby hair always means "meaty actress role!"

    Just Jared

  • While the chemistry between Robert Downey, Jr. and Jude Law was good, the film is drabby (well, it is London in the latter half of the 1800s) and dull in far too many spots, felt overly long too, then mix in Guy Ritchie's penchant for quick flashback cuts to explain Holmes 'observations that cut to the truth, the film feels anachronistic at times to its detriment.

    Home Theater Forum

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