Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A genus of araceous plants, natives of tropical America.
  • noun [I. c.] The pharmaceutical name for the root of the skunk-cabbage, Symplocarpus fœtidus (sometimes called Dracontium fœtidum). The root is used as an acrid irritant, as an antispasmodic, etc.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun pharmacy, obsolete The roots and rhizomes of skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any plant of the genus Dracontium; strongly malodorous tropical American plants usually with gigantic leaves

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From the former genus name Dracontium, from Latin dracontium ("dragon-wort"), from Ancient Greek δρακόντιον (drakontion).

Examples

  • Every object assumes a more majestic and picturesque character; the soil, watered by springs, is furrowed in every direction; trees of gigantic height, covered with lianas, rise from the ravines; their bark, black and burnt by the double action of the light and the oxygen of the atmosphere, contrasts with the fresh verdure of the pothos and dracontium, the tough and shining leaves of which are sometimes several feet long.

    Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America

  • Every object assumes a more majestic and picturesque character; the soil, watered by springs, is furrowed in every direction; trees of gigantic height, covered with lianas, rise from the ravines; their bark, black and burnt by the double action of the light and the oxygen of the atmosphere, contrasts with the fresh verdure of the pothos and dracontium, the tough and shining leaves of which are sometimes several feet long.

    Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America, During the Year 1799-1804 — Volume 1

  • And as we now learnt that over the vast plain before us for seventy miles in that arid region no water could be found but such as was brackish and fetid, and no kind of food but southernwood, wormwood, dracontium, and other bitter herbs, we filled the vessels which we had with sweet water, and having slain the camels and the rest of the beasts of burden, we thus sought to insure some kind of supplies, though not very wholesome.

    The Roman History of Ammianus Marcellinus During the Reigns of the Emperors Constantius, Julian, Jovianus, Valentinian, and Valens

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.