Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of drag-net.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He will go a long way if he does not throw himself into the river, and even so he will get as far as the drag-nets at

    A Distinguished Provincial at Paris

  • Fishing with explosives and trawlers with drag-nets has also caused extensive damage to this sensitive ecosystem.

    Indochina mangroves

  • A million; and promptly, too, or that little head of ours will be swaying to and fro in the drag-nets at Saint-Cloud, while we are gone to find out whether or no there is a Supreme

    Father Goriot

  • But the best catches were made with the drag-nets, which brought up at each haul carp, bream, salmon, saltwater pike, and a number of medium-sized sterlets, which wealthy gourmets have sent alive to

    Robur the Conqueror

  • He spoke of fyke-nets and drag-nets and warp-lines, and of eel-spearing through the ice.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 26, September, 1880

  • Why will they lower their drag-nets into the unfathomable waters, in the vain attempt to bring up your pearls and gems, whose lustre would pale to ashes in the garish light, -- whose only sparkle is in the deep sea-soundings?

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 59, September, 1862

  • A million; and promptly, too, or that little head of yours will be swaying to and fro in the drag-nets at Saint-Cloud, while we are gone to find out whether or no there is a Supreme Being.

    Paras. 500–599

  • Though, as we have seen, crocodiles have long ago left the Lower Nile, the river abounds in fish, and from the terraces of its banks one may constantly see fishermen throwing their hand-nets, while in the shallows and backwaters of the river, drag-nets are frequently employed.

    Peeps at Many Lands: Egypt

  • Why will they lower their drag-nets into the unfathomable waters, in the vain attempt to bring up your pearls and gems, whose luster would pale to ashes in the garish light, whose only sparkle is in the deep sea-soundings?

    The Wit and Humor of America, Volume IV. (of X.)

  • A thorough survey required organization and expensive means, such as torches, boats, fishing tongs and drag-nets; and why scour it at all, if not thoroughly and over every inch?

    The Prince of India — Volume 02

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