Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of dragging.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Especially, when you take into account how the military is almost always draggings its feet regarding deaths that put it in a bad light.

    Balkinization

  • He was now dragged there to a Sunday dinner; and he knew that he should often be dragged there — that he could not avoid such draggings.

    The Small House at Allington

  • Though a desperate disregard for anything like property rights had prompted the sudden snatch and the thief-like dash for cover, I am glad to be able to say that common honesty, or some shadowy simulacrum of it, revived presently and sent me back to the hotel, though not without terrible foot-draggings, you may be sure.

    Branded

  • Then we rushed down the slope and took up our position in a little open space in front of the gate, that now was tottering to its fall beneath the blows and draggings of the Arabs.

    Allan and the Holy Flower

  • For the carriage had stopped, after a rapid course, at Sir Mark's house in Bourne Square, where they had to wait some minutes before, in response to several draggings at the bell, the door was opened by an elderly housemaid.

    Witness to the Deed

  • As I lay in my hammock that night, overhead I heard the slow weary draggings of the three ponderous strangers along the encumbered deck.

    The Piazza Tales

  • Listening to these draggings and concussions, I thought me of the haunt from which they came; an isle full of metallic ravines and gulches, sunk bottomlessly into the hearts of splintered mountains, and covered for many miles with inextricable thickets.

    The Piazza Tales

  • He was now dragged there to a Sunday dinner; and he knew that he should often be dragged there, -- that he could not avoid such draggings.

    The Small House at Allington

  • If Ruth, with coaxings and draggings, induced him to come out with her, he went with measured steps around his fields, his head bent to the ground with the same abstracted, unseeing look; never smiling -- never changing the expression of his face, not even to one of deeper sadness, when anything occurred which might be supposed to remind him of his dead wife.

    Ruth

  • To hear Foster describe the violence taking place in Jamaica as lynching, and to hear accounts of beatings, draggings, dismemberment and hanging, simply reveals that discriminatory violence on the order of the antebellum South is still alive in our society.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

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