Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A simple Scots food made from oatmeal and water.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Jamie had a few handfuls of oats in a small bag in his sporran, and forced me to eat drammach-oats mixed with cold water.

    Sick Cycle Carousel

  • "I should have warned ye before that we'd likely end up sleeping in haystacks, wi 'naught but heather ale and drammach for food."

    Sick Cycle Carousel

  • Duncan, who had risen before dawn every day of his life, usually in the expectation of a dry crust or at most, a bit of drammach-oatmeal mixed with water-woke now to find a steaming pot of tea beside his bed, accompanied by a bowl of creamy parritch, liberally garnished with honey and cream, toast drenched in butter, eggs fried with ham.

    A Breath of Snow and Ashes

  • We sat down, therefore, in a howe of the hill-side till the mist should have risen, and made ourselves a dish of drammach, and held a council of war.

    Kidnapped: The Adventures of David Balfour

  • We lay there (for the banks hid us), drank again and again, bathed our chests, let our wrists trail in the running water till they ached with the chill; and at last, being wonderfullv renewed, we got out the meal-bag and made drammach in the iron pan.

    Kidnapped: The Adventures of David Balfour

  • Our only food was drammach and a portion of cold meat that we had carried from the Cage; and as for drink, Heaven knows we had no want of water.

    Kidnapped: The Adventures of David Balfour

  • We lay there (for the banks hid us), drank again and again, bathed our chests, let our wrists trail in the running water till they ached with the chill; and at last, being wonderfully renewed, we got out the meal-bag and made drammach in the iron pan.

    Kidnapped

  • "Three days wi 'nothing; a week with naught more than drammach-a handful of oats and a little milk.

    Sick Cycle Carousel

  • From such broken slumbers, I would be aroused in the gloaming, to sit up in the same puddle where I had slept, and sup cold drammach; the rain driving sharp in my face or running down my back in icy trickles; the mist enfolding us like as in a gloomy chamber -- or, perhaps, if the wind blew, falling suddenly apart and showing us the gulf of some dark valley where the streams were crying aloud.

    Kidnapped: The Adventures of David Balfour

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.