Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural of drollery.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Both miniatures sit atop two short columns of text, framed by exuberant borders of vines, flowers, birds and "drolleries"—fantastic creatures of minute delicacy and detail.

    Past the Crowds, the Louvre's Little Gem of a Show

  • Not just any old millionaires either were the beneficiaries of Harry Lehr's charming singing, skilled piano playing, faultless tastes, shrewd advice, incessant drolleries and talent for taking feminine roles at amateur theatricals.

    Michael Henry Adams: Queers in the Mirror: A Brief History of Old-Fashioned Gay Marriage in New York, Part One

  • Then he began to deal out his drolleries, such as would make the dismallest jemmy guffaw, and gave vent to all manner of buffooneries; but the Caliph laughed not neither smiled, whereat

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • In addition to his mind, he has a lecture style that a colleague once referred to as "a stream of drolleries."

    In Praise of Paul Szarmach

  • There were also two or three Dutch drolleries, as the pictures of Ostade and Teniers were then termed, with one good painting of the Italian school.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • Dulness fled from their presence; they could tell stories, whistle melodies, and sing comic songs without weariness or cessation: fortunate were those near enough to be enlivened by their drolleries during the tedium of a night detention.

    The Englishwoman in America

  • We have said that our artist has a great love for the drolleries of the Green Island.

    George Cruikshank

  • I saw today at dinner, venerable divines and sage looking men, convulsed with laughter at his drolleries and quaint original manners.3

    Mark Twain

  • It was a big success: “wit without vulgarity,”30 no less, and garnished near the end with “all kinds of concealed jokes, drolleries, flashes of humor and sarcasm.”

    Mark Twain

  • I saw today at dinner, venerable divines and sage looking men, convulsed with laughter at his drolleries and quaint original manners.3

    Mark Twain

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