Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of dromon.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The warships of this period were called "dromons," a term that persists even in the time of the Turkish invasion eight centuries later.

    A History of Sea Power

  • The dromons of the Eastern empire, with their stout build and two banks of oars, had given way to a long, narrow vessel with a single bank of oars which had been developed by men who lived on the shores of the sheltered lagoons of the

    A History of Sea Power

  • Constantine IV, the Emperor, was quick to see the possibilities of the innovation and equipped his dromons with projecting brass tubes for squirting the substance upon the enemy's ships.

    A History of Sea Power

  • There were two classes of dromons, graded according to size, and a third class of ship known as the "pamphylian," which was apparently of a cruiser type, less cumbered with superstructure.

    A History of Sea Power

  • Instead he withdrew his dromons out of the Bosphorus and thereafter followed the less risky policy of a blockade.

    A History of Sea Power

  • In the Horn lay a few antiquated dromons and a few others still on the stocks.

    A History of Sea Power

  • Ship after ship was rammed by the Christian dromons or set on fire by the terrible substance which every Arab regarded with superstitious dread.

    A History of Sea Power

  • Probably there were not more than 1500 of these vessels all told and they must have been small compared with the Christian dromons; nevertheless they presented an appalling danger at that moment.

    A History of Sea Power

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