Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An ancient road or track along which cattle may be driven, but which is not kept in repair: same as drove, n., 2.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • In these solitary regions the cattle under the charge of our drovers derived their subsistence chiefly by picking their food as they went along the drove-road, or sometimes by the tempting opportunity of a START AND OWERLOUP, or invasion of the neighbouring pasture, where an occasion presented itself.

    Chronicles of the Canongate

  • In these solitary regions, the cattle under the charge of our drovers subsisted themselves cheaply, by picking their food as they went along the drove-road, or sometimes by the tempting opportunity of a _start and owerloup_, or invasion of the neighbouring pasture, where an occasion presented itself.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 10, No. 280, October 27, 1827

  • MacDonald showing the way with his kilt-tail about his waist A hunter from a hamlet at the glen foot gladly left the smoking ruin of his home and guided us on a drove-road into the wilds of Lochaber, among mountains more stupendous than those we had left behind.

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • And our picking was bad indeed, for instead of taking what we learned again was a drove-road through to Tynree, we stood more to the right and plunged into what after all turned out to be nothing better than a corrie among the hills.

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • Refreshed by our rest and heartened by our meal, we took to the drove-road almost with lightness, and walked through the evening till the moon, the same that gleamed on Loch Linnhe and Lochiel, and lighted

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • Now, I say, the march rins on the tap o’ the hill where the wind and water shears; but Jock o’ Dawston Cleugh again, he contravenes that, and says that it hauds down by the auld drove-road that gaes awa by the Knot o’ the Gate ower to Keeldar-ward—and that makes an unco difference.

    Chapter XXXVI

  • An ill-marked stony drove-road guided me forward; and I met nearly half-a-dozen bullock-carts descending from the woods, each laden with a whole pine-tree for the winter's firing.

    Travels With A Donkey In The Cevennes

  • An ill-marked stony drove-road guided me forward; and I met nearly half a dozen bullock-carts descending from the woods, each laden with a whole pine-tree for the winter's firing.

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 1 (of 25)

  • The driver's attention was riveted on this strange uncouth figure, and, as the drove-road passed at no great distance from the spot, he first called, but, receiving no answer, he went up to the spot, and behold it was the above-mentioned young man, who had hung himself in the hay rope that was tying down the rick.

    The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner

  • Now, I say the march rins on the tap o 'the hill where the wind and water shears; but Jock o' Dawston Cleugh again, he contravenes that, and says that it bauds down by the auld drove-road that gaes awa by the

    Guy Mannering — Complete

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