Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of dubiety.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And generally we rest pretty content with our failures; we are content to be misapprehended by cackling flirts; but when once a man is moonstruck with this affection of love, he makes it a point of honour to clear such dubieties away.

    Virginibus Puerisque and other papers

  • She is aware too of ethical dubieties in what she finally decides to do.

    Shakespeare

  • Though something exceptional in the moral quality of Captain Vere made him, in earnest encounter with a fellow-man, a veritable touch-stone of that man's essential nature, yet now as to Claggart and what was really going on in him, his feeling partook less of intuitional conviction than of strong suspicion clogged by strange dubieties.

    Billy Budd

  • While this has its obvious dubieties and disadvantages, any other course would have smacked of prettification -- a fate which such a book as "Yama" surely does not deserve.

    Yama: the pit

  • Let us not keep on forever with our fancies and illusions, with our analysing and interpreting and circulating of complex dubieties.

    Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá

  • Belief is the mood which emancipates us from the paralysing dubieties of distraught souls, and leaves us full possession of ourselves by furnishing an unshaken and inexpugnable base for action and thought, and subordinating passion to conviction.

    Critical Miscellanies, Vol. I Essay 2: Carlyle

  • If he could only have been sure of her moral exemption from taint, a generous ardour, in reserve behind his anxious dubieties, would have precipitated Dudley to quench disapprobation and brave the world under a buckler of those monetary advantages, which he had but stoutly to plead with the House of

    One of Our Conquerors — Volume 4

  • If he could only have been sure of her moral exemption from taint, a generous ardour, in reserve behind his anxious dubieties, would have precipitated

    One of Our Conquerors — Complete

  • He had more than O'Connell's dread to pass irretrievably outside the law, although he might not have scrupled to drive the proverbial carriage and six through law's usual dubieties of expression, particularly in certain sections of the Victorian Education Acts. As one of the earliest Irish colonists from the old country, he soon rose to the leading position amongst his fellow-colonist Irishmen.

    Personal Recollections of Early Melbourne and Victoria

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