Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A simplified spelling of doublet.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And really it was kind of a-- a dublet (ph) short.

    CNN Transcript Sep 14, 2007

  • Shaping in this context has a history; it was first used in 1564 in an English archdeaconry: “His shappinge apparell was a yowlowe sattanne dublet and a payre of housse.”

    No Uncertain Terms

  • Then came two other squires whereof one carryed his dublet the other his breeches.

    Christmas: Its Origin and Associations Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries

  • Furst hold to hym a petycote aboue your {e} brest and barme, his dublet þañ aftur to put in boþe hys arme, 892 his stomacher {e} well {e} y-chaffed to kepe hym fro harme, his vampeys [242] and sokkes, þañ all day he may go warme;

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • They also beheld (to their greatest marueile) a dublet of Canuas made after the English fashion, a shirt, a girdle, three shoes for contrary feete, and of vnequall bignesse, which they well coniectured to be the apparell of our fiue poore countreymen, which were intercepted the last yeere by these Countrey people, about fiftie leagues from this place, further within the Straights.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, Vol. XII., America, Part I.

  • And considering also their rauenous and bloody disposition in eating any kind of raw flesh or carrion howsoeuer stinking, it is to bee thought that they had slaine and deuoured our men: For the dublet which was found in their tents had many holes therein being made with their arrowes and darts.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, Vol. XII., America, Part I.

  • For who would not thinke it a ridiculous thing to see a Lady in her milke-house with a velvet gowne, and at a bridal in her cassock of mockado: a Gentleman of the Countrey among the bushes and briers, goes in a pounced dublet and a paire of embroidered hosen, the the Cities to weare a fries Ierkin and a paire of leather breeches? yet some such phantasticals haue I knowen, and one a certaine knight, of all other the most vaine, who commonly would come to the

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • For who would not thinke it a ridiculous thing to see a Lady in her milke-house with a veluet gowne, and at a bridall in her cassock of mockado: a Gentleman of the Countrey among the bushes and briers, goe in a pounced dublet and a paire of embrodered hosen, in the Citie to weare a frise Ierkin and a paire of leather breeches? yet some such phantasticals haue I knowen, and one a certaine knight, of all other the most vaine, who commonly would come to the Sessions, and other ordinarie meetings and Commissions in the Countrey, so bedect with buttons and aglets of gold and such costly embroderies, as the poore plaine men of the Countrey called him (for his gaynesse) the golden knight.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Gilborne, my late apprentice, the some of fortye shillings, and my mouse-coloured velvit hose, and a white taffety dublet, a blacke taffety sute, my purple cloke, sword and dagger, and my base viall. "

    A Book of the Play Studies and Illustrations of Histrionic Story, Life, and Character

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