Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A very heavy fowling-piece used for shooting ducks, and usually mounted upon a fixture in a punt or skiff.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Highlanders, the attendants of Evan, one of whom had upon his shoulder a hatchet at the end of a pole, called a Lochaber-axe,38 and the other a long ducking-gun.

    Waverley

  • Then the window beside it opened suddenly, and he was confronted with the double-muzzle of a long ducking-gun.

    The Heritage of Dedlow Marsh and Other Tales

  • Fowling-pieces of all sizes, from the long ducking-gun mounted on a swivel for boat use to the light single-barrel or carbine, stood in racks against the walls; game-bags, revolvers in their holsters, hunting and fishing knives in their sheaths, depended from hooks above them.

    The Heritage of Dedlow Marsh and Other Tales

  • [Footnote: See Note 14] and the other a long ducking-gun.

    Waverley

  • a pole, called a Lochaber-axe, [Footnote: See Note 14] and the other a long ducking-gun.

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • The axe, which was also much used by the natives of Ireland, is supposed to have been introduced into both countries from Scandinavia.] and the other a long ducking-gun.

    Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since

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