Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dramatic or melodramatic piece for two performers only.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Despairing probably at being unable to obtain this obedience, Mozart thought seriously of breaking up the form of opera, and of putting in its place, in 1778, a sort of melodrama (of which Rousseau had given an example in 1773), which he called "duodrama," where music and poetry were loosely associated, yet not dependent on each other, but went side by side on two parallel roads (Letter of 12 November, 1778).]

    Musicians of To-Day

  • She had merely had her chance for the great duodrama, and thrown it away for a callow dream.

    The Sisters-In-Law

  • With regard to the monodrama, or duodrama, a voice part is by no means necessary, as not a single note is sung, but entirely spoken; in short, it is a recitative with instruments, only the actor speaks the words instead of singing them.

    The Letters of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

  • He will not hear of my leaving this till I have written a duodrama for him, and indeed I did not long hesitate, for I have often wished to write this style of drama.

    The Letters of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

  • Despairing probably at being unable to obtain this obedience, Mozart thought seriously of breaking up the form of opera, and of putting in its place, in 1778, a sort of melodrama (of which Rousseau had given an example in 1773), which he called “duodrama,” where music and poetry were loosely associated, yet not dependent on each other, but went side by side on two parallel roads (Letter of 12 November, 1778).]

    Musicians of To-Day

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