Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Alternative form of durian.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun tree of southeastern Asia having edible oval fruit with a hard spiny rind

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Among them the durion is the most esteemed by the natives, and the mangosteen by Europeans.

    The Golden Chersonese and the Way Thither

  • Among them the durion is the most esteemed by the natives, and the mangosteen by Europeans.

    The Golden Chersonese and the way thither

  • The durion is a forest tree of the loftiest order, bearing resemblance to the elm, only with a smooth bark, which is also scaly.

    The Castaways

  • It would not perhaps be correct to say that the durion is the best of all fruits, because it cannot supply the place of a sub-acid juicy kind; such as the orange, grape, mango, and mangosteen, whose refreshing and cooling qualities are so wholesome and grateful; but as producing a food of the most exquisite flavour, it is unsurpassed.

    The Castaways

  • Every village consists of such houses as I have described before, grouped, but not by any means closely, under the shade of cocoa-palms, jak, durion, bread-fruit, mango, nutmeg, and other fruit-trees.

    The Golden Chersonese and the way thither

  • The jak trees (artocarpus incisa), near of kin to the bread-fruit, and the durion, flourish round all the dwellings.

    The Golden Chersonese and the way thither

  • Then we had a slim repast of soda water and bananas, the Hadji worshiped with his face toward Mecca, and the boatmen prepared an elaborate curry for themselves, with salt fish for its basis, and for its tastiest condiment blachang — a Malay preparation much relished by European lovers of durion and decomposed cheese.

    The Golden Chersonese and the way thither

  • The jak trees (artocarpus incisa), near of kin to the bread-fruit, and the durion, flourish round all the dwellings.

    The Golden Chersonese and the Way Thither

  • Every village consists of such houses as I have described before, grouped, but not by any means closely, under the shade of cocoa-palms, jak, durion, bread-fruit, mango, nutmeg, and other fruit-trees.

    The Golden Chersonese and the Way Thither

  • The durion grows to the size of a man's head, and is covered closely with hard, sharp spines.

    The Golden Chersonese and the Way Thither

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