Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Subject to import tax.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Subject to a customs duty: as, dutiable goods.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective U.S. Subject to the payment of a duty; as dutiable goods.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective on which duty must be paid when imported or sold

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective subject to import tax

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • If you have more that US$1,000 in dutiable items, you may be required to hire a customs broker.

    Driving to SMA in Feb.

  • If an incoming package does contain dutiable items, then both the duty, and the customs inspection fee have to be paid before the package will be delivered.

    Powell's Books/Shipping costs

  • "The magnitude of the tariff shock in the Smoot-Hawley legislation, which increased the domestic price of imports by 5% at a time when dutiable imports were just 1.4% of GDP, was simply not large enough to trigger the kind of economic contraction experienced after 1930," Mr. Irwin concludes.

    Heavy Duty

  • Quantitatively, the so-called Kennedy Round of tariff cuts was large enough to be noticed, but not earth-shaking: as this legislation was phased in, our average duty on dutiable imports fell from 14.3 percent in 1967 to 9.9 percent in 1972.

    Ian Fletcher: Kennedy's Blunder, or How Free Trade Turned Sour for America

  • Smoot-Hawley, in contrast, raised the average dutiable rate by a mere 15%-18%, Mr. Irwin reckons.

    Heavy Duty

  • U.S. tariffs these days are nothing compared with the towering levies of yesteryear—less than 5% on dutiable imports versus 45% in 1930.

    Heavy Duty

  • Quantitatively, the so-called Kennedy Round of tariff cuts was large enough to be noticed, but not earth-shaking: as this legislation was phased in, our average duty on dutiable imports fell from 14.3 percent in 1967 to 9.9 percent in 1972.

    Ian Fletcher: Kennedy's Blunder, or How Free Trade Turned Sour for America

  • In 1971, a trade deficit of one-half of one percent of GDP about a tenth of today's level was enough to frighten Nixon into imposing a temporary 10 percent surcharge tariff on all dutiable goods.

    Ian Fletcher: Kennedy's Blunder, or How Free Trade Turned Sour for America

  • Quantitatively, the so-called Kennedy Round of tariff cuts was large enough to be noticed, but not earth-shaking: as this legislation was phased in, our average duty on dutiable imports fell from 14.3 percent in 1967 to 9.9 percent in 1972.

    Ian Fletcher: Kennedy's Blunder, or How Free Trade Turned Sour for America

  • In 1971, a trade deficit of one-half of one percent of GDP about a tenth of today's level was enough to frighten Nixon into imposing a temporary 10 percent surcharge tariff on all dutiable goods.

    Ian Fletcher: Kennedy's Blunder, or How Free Trade Turned Sour for America

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