Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of dyehouse.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Iron was an effective component of the dyebath for black, but it was believed to weaken fibers and so was rarely recommended as a coloring material in dyehouses. reference

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • The air was fresher up here, above the tanneries and dyehouses.

    Wildfire

  • Indigo was a more efficient dyestuff, but woad was one native to Europe. reference As a result, we might expect to find regular resistance to the use of indigo as it began to replace woad in European dyehouses. reference Substitution patterns were different in every region, however.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • During much of the eighteenth century the blue-and-white patterned textiles that resulted were popular dress and furnishing fabrics, and a specialty of German dyehouses. 11

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Descriptions and discussions appeared in specialist and general publications, both the periodical press and encyclopedias, increasing the reach of the information and ensuring that its audience extended beyond commercial dyehouses. 9 Over the next several years, many people sent their version of a secret Saxon blue to French officials.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Workers were imported to set up and operate dyehouses specializing in Turkey red.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Sal ammoniac factories existed but none produced enough to supply all dyehouses in France.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Sal ammoniac was difficult to obtain throughout France in the quantity and quality dyehouses would require; differences between the results obtained from each source for sal ammoniac emphasized the need for standard materials. 4 Macquer and Pont considered the sources available; could Antoine Baumé's factory supply more consistently than those of Pia or Capelle?

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Three different dyebaths, each with its own preparation and finishing stages, might require the expertise of two or three different dyehouses.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Val-Noble, where its shallow waters are stained by the dyehouses, and loaded with refuse from the other industries of the town.

    The Jealousies of a Country Town

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.