Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The typical genus of predaceous water-beetles of the family Dytiscidæ, having the metasternal spiracles covered by the elytra, the front tarsi five-jointed, and patellate in the male, and the hind tarsi not ciliate, with the claws equal.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The large dytiscus beetle is the great enemy of small fish.

    The Naturalist on the Thames

  • It is a dytiscus beetle, whose compound eyes have mistaken the shine of the glass in the moonlight for the gleam of a pond.

    The Naturalist on the Thames

  • The great carnivorous water-beetle, the dytiscus, after catching and eating other creatures all day, with two-minute intervals to come up, poke the tips of its wings out of the water and jam some air against its spiracles, before descending once more to its subaqueous hunting-grounds, will rise by night from the surface of the Thames, lift again those horny wing-cases, unfold

    The Naturalist on the Thames

  • The larva not only of the carnivorous dytiscus but also of the vegetable-feeding water-beetle are ferocious and carnivorous, and deadly enemies of young fish and ova.

    The Naturalist on the Thames

  • The fish were too tame and easily caught, and their beauty of too civilized an order; the rare, flat, vicious dytiscus "took the cake."

    Peter Ibbetson

  • There was M. le Major, in his green frock-coat, on his knees near a little hawthorn-tree by the brink, among the water-logged roots of which there dwelt a cunning old dytiscus as big as the bowl of a table-spoon -- a prize we had often tried to catch in vain.

    Peter Ibbetson

  • And of all things in the world, we never tired of that walk through the avenue and park and Bois de Boulogne to the Mare d'Auteuil; strolling there leisurely on an early spring afternoon, just in time to spend a midsummer hour or two on its bank, and watch the old water-rat and the dytiscus and the tadpoles and newts, and see the frogs jump; and then walking home at dusk in the school-room of my old home; and then back to war, well-lighted "Magna sed Apta" by moonlight through the avenue on

    Peter Ibbetson

  • One of these was put into a bowl with a dytiscus beetle, which, "pouncing upon him like a hawk upon an unsuspecting lark, drove its scythe-like horny jaws right into the back of the poor little fish.

    The Naturalist on the Thames

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