Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In old Scots law, a bankrupt who had made a cessio bonorum to his creditors.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “Well, you dyvour bankrupt, ” was the first word, “have you brought me my rent?

    Wandering Willie’s Tale

  • “Well, you dyvour bankrupt, ” was the first word, “have you brought me my rent?

    Wandering Willie’s Tale

  • "Well, you dyvour bankrupt," was the first word, "have you brought me my rent?"

    Stories by English Authors: Scotland (Selected by Scribners)

  • A dyvour [23] buys your butter, woo ', and cheese,

    Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Volume 3

  • A dyvour [23] buys your butter, woo ', and cheese,

    Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete

  • 'Well, you dyvour bankrupt,' was the first word, 'have you brought me my rent?'

    Redgauntlet

  • As the redemption of the soul is precious and ceases for ever, so the broken and dyvour (485) man having become a bankrupt, shall never make up or pay his debt to all eternity.

    The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning

  • Away rode my gudesire to his chief creditor (him they caa’d Laurie Lapraik), to try if he could make ony thing out of him; but when he tauld his story, he got but the warst word in his wame—thief, beggar, and dyvour, were the saftest terms; and to the boot of these hard terms, Laurie brought up the auld story of his dipping his hand in the blood of God’s saunts, just as if a tenant could have helped riding with the Laird, and that a laird like Sir Robert Redgauntlet.

    Wandering Willie’s Tale

  • Away rode my gudesire to his chief creditor (him they caa’d Laurie Lapraik), to try if he could make onything out of him; but when he tauld his story, he got but the worst word in his wame—thief, beggar, and dyvour were the saftest terms; and to the boot of these hard terms, Laurie brought up the auld story of dipping his hand in the blood of God’s saunts, just as if a tenant could have helped riding with the laird, and that a laird like Sir Robert Redgauntlet.

    Wandering Willie’s Tale

  • Lapraik) to try if he could make onything out of him; but when he tauld his story, he got but the worst word in his wame — thief, beggar, and dyvour, were the saftest terms; and to the boot of these hard terms,

    Redgauntlet

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