Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a skilled horseman in the Caucasus and Central Asia.
  • n. a brave male person in general.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Turkic languages (cf. Nogai  (cigit), Tatar егет (yeget, "young male")), via Russian джигит (džigít).

Examples

  • [14] Among the Chechens, a dzhigit is the same as a brave among the Indians, but the word is inseparably connected with the idea of skillful horsemanship.

    Hadji Murad

  • They jabbered for a long time, and then the dark man jumped up, came to Zhílin, and said: 'Dzhigit Russ, dzhigit Russ!'

    Twenty-Three Tales

  • "He says Shamil is a great man, learned, holy, and a dzhigit."

    Hadji Murad

  • "Still there's no denying it! he's a fine fellow -- a regular dzhigit!"

    Hadji Murad

  • And the recollection of himself as a little child reminded him of his beloved son, Yusúf, whose head he himself had shaved for the first time; and now this Yusúf was a handsome young dzhigit.

    Hadji Murad

  • Hadji Murád, his eyes turned down, sat stroking the boy's curly head and saying: "Dzhigit, dzhigit!"

    Hadji Murad

  • A Cossack is inclined to hate less the dzhigit hillsman who maybe has killed his brother, than the soldier quartered on him to defend his village, but who has defiled his hut with tobacco-smoke.

    The Cossacks

  • The song told of how a dzhigit, Hamzád, with his brave followers captured a herd of white horses from the Russians, and how a Russian Prince followed him beyond the Térek and surrounded him with an army as large as a forest; and then the song went on to tell how Hamzád killed the horses, and, with his men entrenched behind this gory bulwark, fought the Russians as long as they had bullets in their rifles, daggers in their belts, and blood in their veins.

    Hadji Murad

  • My boy, my dzhigit, from all fear shall be free! "

    Hadji Murad

  • […] The Cossack is inclined to hate less the dzhigit hillsman who maybe has killed his brother, than the soldier quartered on him to defend his village but who has defiled his hut with tobacco smoke "(98).

    AFF Doublethink Online

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