Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of ealdorman.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An alderman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The titles of honor among our Saxon ancestors were, Etheling, prince of the blond: chancellor, assistant to the king in giving judgments: alderman, or ealderman, (not earldonnan, as Rapin Thoyras writes this word in his first edition,) governor or viceroy.

    The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints January, February, March

  • Each division had a court subordinate to those that were superior, the highest in each shire being the shire-gemot, or folck-mote, which was held twice a year, and in which the bishop or his deputy, and the ealderman, or his viceregent, the sheriff, presided.

    The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints January, February, March

  • Odun, the valiant ealderman who led them, fled, with his thanes and their followers, to the castle of Kwineth, a stronghold defended only by a loose wall of stones, in the Saxon fashion.

    Historical Tales, Vol. 4 (of 15) The Romance of Reality

  • Berkshire or Dorset, proud of his five hydes of land; there, half an ealderman, the Danish thegn of Norfolk or Ely, discontented with his forty; some were there in right of smaller offices under the crown; some traders, and sons of traders, for having crossed the high seas three times at their own risk; some could boast the blood of Offa and

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 03

  • Often in the good old days before the Monk-king reigned, kings and ealdermen had thus gone forth a-maying; but these merriments, savouring of heathenesse, that good prince misliked: nevertheless the song was as blithe, and the boughs were as green, as if king and ealderman had walked in the train.

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 01

  • There sate, half a yeoman, the Saxon thegn of Berkshire or Dorset, proud of his five hydes of land; there, half an ealderman, the Danish thegn of Norfolk or Ely, discontented with his forty; some were there in right of smaller offices under the crown; some traders, and sons of traders, for having crossed the high seas three times at their own risk; some could boast the blood of Offa and Egbert; and some traced but three generations back to neatherd and ploughman; and some were Saxons and some were Danes: and some from the western shires were by origin Britons, though little cognisant of their race.

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Complete

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.